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WASTE BATTERY DISPOSAL POLICY

The Office of Environmental Health and Radiation Safety (EHRS) will collect used batteries for recycling only from University research laboratories. To request a pickup of used batteries you may submit an online waste pickup request form at Chemical Waste Pickup Request Form

Other University departments that want to recycle batteries are encouraged to sign up with "Call2Recycle" which is a totally free recycling service.  Once you complete the online registration form they will send you a collection box which can shipped back to them free of charge when filled.

Regular alkaline batteries can be disposed of in the regular trash. 

 

Battery Disposal

 

Battery Type Disposal Procedure
Alkaline Regular Trash
Lead Acid Through EHRS
Lithium Through EHRS
Mercury Through EHRS
Nickel Cadmium (NiCad) Through EHRS
Nickel Metal Hydride Through EHRS

Alkaline (carbon-Zinc): These are common non-rechargeable batteries that most people use. Alkaline batteries are not regulated as hazardous waste and can be disposed of in the regular trash or sent to be recycled.

Lead-Acid batteries: These include automotive and smaller gel-cell batteries commonly use in emergency lighting systems. Lead-Acid batteries contain regulated amounts of lead and must be recycled.

Lithium Batteries: These batteries come in a variety of shapes and sizes, and are commonly used in computer clocks, cameras, watches, and other equipment. These batteries are not regulated hazardous waste, but EHRS manages them as such.

Mercury batteries: These are usually small and button shaped. Mercury batteries contain regulated amounts of mercury and should be handled as hazardous waste. These batteries are no longer available in the United States although they may still be found in older equipment.

Nickel-Cadmium: These are the most common rechargeable batteries and are commonly found in cellular phones, and other types of rechargeable equipment. NiCd batteries contain regulated amounts of cadmium and should be handled as hazardous wastes.

Nickel Metal Hydride: hese are rechargeable batteries that are commonly used in cordless hand tools and other types of equipment. These batteries are not regulated as hazardous waste, but EHRS manages them as such.

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